2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities

2014-2015
Estimates

PART III – Departmental Expenditure Plans: Reports on Plans and Priorities


Purpose

Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP) are individual expenditure plans for each department and agency. These reports provide increased levels of detail over a three-year period on an organization's main priorities by strategic outcome, program and planned/expected results, including links to related resource requirements presented in the Main Estimates. In conjunction with the Main Estimates, Reports on Plans and Priorities serve to inform members of Parliament on planned expenditures of departments and agencies, and support Parliament's consideration of supply bills. The RPPs are typically tabled soon after the Main Estimates by the President of the Treasury Board.

Estimates documents

The Estimates comprises three parts:

  1. Part I - Government Expenditure Plan - provides an overview of the Government's requirements and changes in estimated expenditures from previous fiscal years.

  2. Part II - Main Estimates - supports the appropriation acts with detailed information on the estimated spending and authorities being sought by each federal organization requesting appropriations.

In accordance with Standing Orders of the House of Commons, Parts I and II must be tabled on or before March 1.

  1. Part III - Departmental Expenditure Plans - consists of two components:

    • Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP)
    • Departmental Performance Report (DPR)

DPRs are individual department and agency accounts of results achieved against planned performance expectations as set out in respective RPPs.

The DPRs for the most recently completed fiscal year are tabled in the fall by the President of the Treasury Board.

Supplementary Estimates support Appropriation Acts presented later in the fiscal year. Supplementary Estimates present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or have subsequently been refined to account for developments in particular programs and services. Supplementary Estimates also provide information on changes to expenditure forecasts of major statutory items as well as on such items as: transfers of funds between votes; debt deletion; loan guarantees; and new or increased grants.

For more information on the Estimates, please consult the Treasury Board Secretariat website. Endnote i

Links to the estimates

As shown above, RPPs make up part of the Part III of the Estimates documents. Whereas Part II emphasizes the financial aspect of the Estimates, Part III focuses on financial and non-financial performance information, both from a planning and priorities standpoint (RPP), and an achievements and results perspective (DPR).

The Management Resources and Results Structure (MRRS) establishes a structure for display of financial information in the Estimates and reporting to Parliament via RPPs and DPRs. When displaying planned spending, RPPs rely on the Estimates as a basic source of financial information.

Main Estimates expenditure figures are based on the Annual Reference Level Update which is prepared in the fall. In comparison, planned spending found in RPPs includes the Estimates as well as any other amounts that have been approved through a Treasury Board submission up to February 1 (See Definitions section). This readjusting of the financial figures allows for a more up-to-date portrait of planned spending by program.

Changes to the presentation of the Report on Plans and Priorities

Several changes have been made to the presentation of the RPP partially to respond to a number of requests – from the House of Commons Standing Committees on Public Accounts (PAC - Report 15 Endnote ii), in 2010; and on Government and Operations Estimates (OGGO - Report 7 Endnote iii), in 2012 – to provide more detailed financial and non-financial performance information about programs within RPPs and DPRs, thus improving the ease of their study to support appropriations approval.

  • In Section II, financial, human resources and performance information is now presented at the Program and Sub-program levels for more granularity.
  • The report's general format and terminology have been reviewed for clarity and consistency purposes.
  • Other efforts aimed at making the report more intuitive and focused on Estimates information were made to strengthen alignment with the Main Estimates.

How to read this document

RPPs are divided into four sections:

Section I: Organizational expenditure overview

This Organizational Expenditure Overview allows the reader to get a general glance at the organization. It provides a description of the organization's purpose, as well as basic financial and human resources information. This section opens with the new Organizational Profile, which displays general information about the department, including the names of the minister and the deputy head, the ministerial portfolio, the year the department was established, and the main legislative authorities. This subsection is followed by a new subsection entitled Organizational Context, which includes the Raison d'être, the Responsibilities, the Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture, the Organizational Priorities and the Risk Analysis. This section ends with the Planned Expenditures, the Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes, the Estimates by Votes and the Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. It should be noted that this section does not display any non-financial performance information related to programs (please see Section II).

Section II: Analysis of program(s) by strategic outcome(s)

This Section provides detailed financial and non-financial performance information for strategic outcomes, Programs and sub-programs. This section allows the reader to learn more about programs by reading their respective description and narrative entitled “Planning Highlights”. This narrative speaks to key services or initiatives which support the plans and priorities presented in Section I; it also describes how performance information supports the department's strategic outcome or parent program.

Section III: Supplementary information

This section provides supporting information related to departmental plans and priorities. In this section, the reader will find future-oriented statement of operations and a link to supplementary information tables regarding transfer payments, as well as information related to the greening government operations, internal audits and evaluations, horizontal initiatives, user fees, major crown and transformational projects, and up-front multi-year funding, where applicable to individual organizations. The reader will also find a link to the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report, produced annually by the Minister of Finance, which provides estimates and projections of the revenue impacts of federal tax measures designed to support the economic and social priorities of the Government of Canada.

Section IV: Organizational contact information

In this last section, the reader will have access to organizational contact information.

Definitions

Appropriation

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Budgetary Vs. Non-budgetary Expenditures

Budgetary expenditures – operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to crown corporations

Non-budgetary expenditures – net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

Expected Result

An outcome that a program is designed to achieve.

Full-Time Equivalent (FTE)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. FTEs are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada Outcomes

A set of high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole.

Management Resources and Results Structure (MRRS)

A common approach and structure to the collection, management and reporting of financial and non-financial performance information.

An MRRS provides detailed information on all departmental programs (e.g.: program costs, program expected results and their associated targets, how they align to the government's priorities and intended outcomes, etc.) and establishes the same structure for both internal decision making and external accountability.

Planned Spending

For the purpose of the RPP, planned spending refers to those amounts for which a Treasury Board (TB) submission approval has been received by no later than February 1, 2014. This cut-off date differs from the Main Estimates process. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditure levels presented in the 2014–15 Main Estimates.

Program

A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results, and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture

A structured inventory of a department's programs, where programs are arranged in a hierarchical manner to depict the logical relationship between each program and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Spending Areas

Government of Canada categories of expenditures. There are four spending areas Endnote iv (social affairs, economic affairs, international affairs and government affairs) each comprising three to five Government of Canada outcomes.

Strategic Outcome

A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the department's mandate, vision, and core functions.

Sunset Program

A time-limited program that does not have on-going funding or policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made as to whether to continue the program. (In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration).

Whole-of-Government Framework

A map of the financial and non-financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations that aligns their Programs to a set of high level outcome areas defined for the government as a whole.


Chair's message

For over two decades, the dedicated professionals at the Transportation Safety Board of Canada have worked hard to make sure Canada's transportation network is as safe as it can be. Whenever an accident occurs—be it on our waterways, along our pipelines and railways, or in our skies—TSB investigators seek to find out what happened, why it happened, and what needs to be done so that it doesn't happen again.

Advancing transportation safety is a goal we take very seriously, and over the years we have had a number of successes, starting with the fact that almost three-quarters of our outstanding recommendations have now received our highest rating of “fully satisfactory.” Our latest safety Watchlist, meanwhile, has not only focused attention on the greatest risks to our nation's transportation network, it has spurred new levels of action from both the regulator and industry.

Those are accomplishments to be proud of, but our work is never done. In fact, over the coming year, we plan to work even harder. Over the coming year, will we continue ongoing efforts to improve our information management and to make more efficient use of our human and financial resources—a must in today's environment of fiscal restraint. We will be posting more and more of our occurrence data online for all to access openly. We will work with stakeholders in all four modes to effectively implement the new TSB Regulations, and we will explore the feasibility of legislative and regulatory changes to allow the use of on-board recorders within the framework of safety management systems. Such a move will not only help our investigators, it will pave the way for improved safety in companies all across Canada.

As always, we will also continue to be flexible in our work, responding to crises when and where they arise. Last summer's tragic derailment and fire in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, was one such example. Our dedicated team continues to work actively on this complex investigation, with the goal of providing answers to Canadians as soon as possible.

I remain confident in the unwavering commitment of our professional and talented employees. For twenty-four years, they have worked tirelessly to advance transportation safety across this country, from coast to coast to coast. And that blend of solid experience, combined with a modern, forward-looking approach, will go a long way to steering us safely through the next twenty-four as well.

Section I: Organizational expenditure overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: Peter Van Loan

Deputy Head: Wendy A. Tadros

Ministerial portfolio: Privy Council

Year established: 1990

Main legislative authorities: Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act, S.C. 1989, c. 3

Organizational context

Raison d'être

The Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board is referred to as the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) in its day-to-day activities. The TSB is an independent agency created in 1990 by an Act of Parliament. It operates at arm's length from other government departments and agencies to ensure that there are no real or perceived conflicts of interest. TSB's sole objective is to advance air, marine, rail and pipeline transportation safety. This mandate is fulfilled by conducting independent investigations into selected transportation occurrences to identify the causes and contributing factors, and the safety deficiencies evidenced by an occurrence. The TSB then makes recommendations to reduce or eliminate any such safety deficiencies and reports publicly on its investigations.

The Leader of the Government in the House of Commons is the designated minister for the purposes of tabling the TSB's administrative reports in Parliament, such as the Report on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Report. The TSB forms part of the Privy Council portfolio of departments and agencies.

Responsibilities

The TSB exists as an independent investigation body with the sole goal of advancing transportation safety. Since its inception in 1990, the TSB has conducted thousands of investigations across the modes for which it is responsible.

The TSB is one of many Canadian and foreign organizations involved in improving transportation safety nationally and internationally. Because it has no formal authority to regulate, direct or enforce specific actions, the TSB can only succeed in fulfilling its strategic outcome through the actions of others. Operating at arm's length from other federal departments involved in the transportation field, the Board must present its findings and recommendations in such a manner that compels others to act. This implies ongoing dialogue, information sharing and strategic coordination with organizations such as Transport Canada, the National Energy Board and the Canadian Coast Guard. The TSB must engage industry and foreign regulatory organizations in a similar fashion. Through various means, the TSB must present compelling arguments that will convince these “agents of change” to take action in response to identified safety deficiencies.

As one of the world leaders in its field, the TSB regularly shares its investigation techniques, methodologies and tools with foreign safety organizations by inviting them to participate in in-house training programs in the areas of investigation methodology and human and organizational factors. Under the terms of international agreements, the TSB also provides investigation assistance to foreign safety organizations, such as decoding and analyzing flight recorder data or overseeing engine tear-downs. The TSB also shares data and reports with sister organizations, in addition to participating in international working groups and studies to advance transportation safety.

For more details on the TSB investigation process or the links between the TSB and other federal organizations visit the TSB website Endnote v.

Strategic outcome and program alignment architecture

The structure below illustrates the program activities framework that contributes to the achievement of the TSB strategic outcome.

  1. 1 Strategic Outcome: The risks to the safety of the transportation system are reduced
    1. 1.1 Program: Air Investigations
    2. 1.2 Program: Marine Investigations
    3. 1.3 Program: Rail Investigations
    4. 1.4 Program: Pipeline Investigations
  2. Internal Services

Organizational priorities

The TSB Strategic Plan Endnote vi outlines the four strategic objectives and associated priorities that have been identified by senior management for the period of 2011–12 to 2015–16 in order to achieve its strategic outcome. This plan provides the framework that guides the identification of key activities and the TSB's investment decision-making for the current exercise.

Priority: Responding - Strengthened organizational readiness
1 Type is defined as follows: ongoing: committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the Report on Plans and Priorities.
Type 1 Ongoing
Programs
  • Air Investigations
  • Marine Investigations
  • Rail Investigations
  • Pipeline Investigations
Description

The success of the TSB and its credibility depends largely on the expertise, professionalism and competence of its employees. The TSB will continue to focus on strategic human resources management by investing in the training and development of its employees. In 2014-15, a particular focus will continue to be placed on: updating the accident investigator training program, reviewing the manual of investigations, and streamlining the report production process.

Priority: Managing - Improved information and data management
1 Type is defined as follows: ongoing: committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the Report on Plans and Priorities.
Type 1 Ongoing
Programs
  • Air Investigations
  • Marine Investigations
  • Rail Investigations
  • Pipeline Investigations
Description

The TSB's work is fundamentally reliant on the collection, retention, management and analysis of occurrence information. The TSB will continue to enhance its information management processes and tools by:

  • Completing the formal identification of its information resources of business value, the related repositories and retention periods, and consequently, updating its information management policies and practices;
  • Transitioning to the extent possible to a digital-only approach for information management;
  • Completing the modernization of the database that manages information on Air occurrences;
  • Implementing a multi-modal safety communications tracking tool to monitor safety issues.

In 2014-15, the TSB will also undertake to post statistics and other occurrence data on the web in order to provide open access to such information.

Priority: Communicating - Increased awareness of the TSB
2 Type is defined as follows: ongoing: committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the Report on Plans and Priorities.
Type 2 Ongoing
Programs
  • Air Investigations
  • Marine Investigations
  • Rail Investigations
  • Pipeline Investigations
Description

An increased awareness of the TSB's raison d'être, responsibilities, processes and products provides stakeholders and Canadians with a clearer understanding of TSB's contribution to transportation safety and its expected results. The TSB will sustain its communications and outreach activities to improve awareness of its products and services. In 2014-15, the TSB will conduct a survey of its key stakeholders to seek feedback on its products and services.

Priority: Advocating - Increased effectiveness of TSB products and services
2 Type is defined as follows: ongoing: committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the Report on Plans and Priorities.
Type 2 Ongoing
Programs
  • Air Investigations
  • Marine Investigations
  • Rail Investigations
  • Pipeline Investigations
Description

The TSB has no authority to regulate, direct or enforce specific actions; therefore it can only succeed in fulfilling its strategic outcome through the actions of others. Through various means, the TSB must present compelling arguments that will convince stakeholders to take action in response to identified safety deficiencies. The TSB will endeavor to increase the uptake of recommendations and other safety communications by stakeholders by increasing awareness of the issues through continuously improved communication products and broader outreach activities. In 2014-15, the TSB will refresh its Watchlist and focus its outreach activities around the safety issues representing the greatest risks.

Risk analysis

The TSB operates within the context of a very large and complex Canadian and international transportation system. The following strategic risks have been identified for 2014–15. Each of these risks represents a potential threat to the achievement of the department's strategic objectives.

Key risks
Safeguarding, retention and retrieval of information
Risk

Ineffective safeguarding, retention and retrieval of information pose a risk to the achievement of the TSB mandate. The TSB's work is fundamentally reliant on the collection, retention, management and analysis of occurrence information. The TSB must therefore ensure that information is current, appropriately stored and readily accessible to employees. There is a medium likelihood that gaps in the safeguarding, retention and retrieval of information could have a moderate negative impact on the TSB's ability to deliver its mandate in a timely and effective manner.

Risk Response Strategy

The TSB will continue to enhance the processes, tools and technology in support of the management of its information resources to mitigate the risk of losing critical information and corporate knowledge. In particular the TSB will increase its monitoring of information management practices with respect to the classification, storage and retention of occurrence information with the objective of ensuring a consistent application. The TSB will also investigate options for improving the tools for storing information in the Investigation Management System to ensure compliance with information management policy requirements.

Link to Program
Alignment Architecture
  • Air Investigations
  • Marine Investigations
  • Rail Investigations
  • Pipeline Investigations
Recruitment, development and maintenance of a knowledge workforce
Risk

The success of the TSB and its credibility depend largely on the expertise, professionalism and competence of its employees. Certain key positions at the TSB are “one deep” which means that there is only one person responsible for a specific task, with limited back-up. In addition, some of these key positions also require strong managerial and technical skills. Given the on-going attrition due to employee retirements, the loss of expertise and knowledge may pose a significant risk to the TSB's success. There is medium likelihood that an inadequate human resources capacity will result in a moderate impact with respect to TSB meeting public expectations for responsiveness.

Risk Response Strategy

The TSB is increasing its efforts to maintain its knowledge base and technical expertise through effective recruitment, training and development in order to mitigate this risk.

The TSB Executive Committee monitors staffing, turnover, training and other relevant human resources statistics to monitor for possible workforce issues and implement corrective action as required.

Link to Program Alignment Architecture
  • Air Investigations
  • Marine Investigations
  • Rail Investigations
  • Pipeline Investigations
Operational surge readiness
Risk

The TSB must be ready to respond to occurrences. Inadequate human resources or inexperienced personnel and unclear procedures when a sudden workload surge occurs could impact the department's ability to meet urgent operational requirements and public expectations. An ineffective and/or delayed response could result in negative public perceptions of the TSB's effectiveness which could seriously impact the TSB's credibility. There is a medium likelihood that a surge in transportation occurrences will have a moderate impact on the TSB's ability to effectively respond to investigation demands.

Risk Response Strategy
  • TSB has established partnerships and working relationships with various government agencies and industry to access emergency assistance when required.
  • TSB has put in place an alumni program that can be used to acquire short term expertise when there is an increase in workload.
  • Investigation procedures are well documented.
  • Contingency plans and major occurrence check lists are in place and have been tested.
  • Senior management closely monitors the workload and adjusts priorities as required.
Link to Program
Alignment Architecture
  • Air Investigations
  • Marine Investigations
  • Rail Investigations
  • Pipeline Investigations
Limited financial resources
Risk

The TSB's expenditures are influenced by the number and complexity of transportation occurrences. A significant transportation accident or flurry of smaller size occurrences could significantly increase expenditures and result in resource pressures beyond the Board's available funding. Another risk to TSB's financial resources is progressive reductions in funding announced as a result of government-wide fiscal restraint measures, which reduce the flexibility in the TSB's budget. There is a risk that further budget reductions and/or significant increases in operating costs will impact the delivery of TSB's mandate. There is a medium likelihood that the TSB would have to revise its investigation operations model and this could have a moderate impact on the delivery of its products.

Risk Response Strategy

The TSB Executive Committee will continue to monitor spending on a monthly basis and review budget allocations on a quarterly basis. The TSB will continue to look for opportunities where spending can be minimized in order to provide financial flexibility to respond to priorities that may occur in the year.

The TSB has provisions in place to seek incremental funding from Parliament for major occurrence investigations.

Link to Program
Alignment Architecture
  • Air Investigations
  • Marine Investigations
  • Rail Investigations
  • Pipeline Investigations

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary financial resources (planned spending - dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
29,042,391 30,378,928 30,028,928 30,028,928
Human resources (full-time equivalents—FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
225 225 225
Budgetary planning summary for strategic outcome and programs (dollars)
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services 2011–12 Expenditures 2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Forecast Spending 2014–15 Main Estimates 2014-15 Planned Spending 2015–16 Planned Spending 2016–17 Planned Spending

Strategic Outcome: Risks to the safety of the transportation system are reduced

Air Investigations 14,441,902 13,670,313 13,735,332 12,778,652 13,340,998 13,186,999 13,186,999
Marine Investigations 4,619,751 5,831,259 5,125,436 4,646,782 4,999,311 4,943,311 4,943,311
Rail Investigations 5,105,686 4,703,146 6,051,820 4,646,783 4,955,098 4,899,098 4,899,098
Pipeline Investigations 525,154 457,077 687,103 580,848 590,019 583,019 583,019
Strategic Outcome Subtotal 24,692,493 24,661,795 25,599,691 22,653,065 23,885,426 23,612,427 23,612,427
Internal Services 7,101,288 6,994,482 6,826,416 6,389,326 6,493,502 6,416,501 6,416,501
Total 31,793,781 31,656,277 32,426,107 29,042,391 30,378,928 30,028,928 30,028,928

The 2011-12 and 2012-13 expenditures presented above are actual results as presented in the Public Accounts of Canada. Spending over these two years is consistent.

Forecasted spending in 2013-14 is higher than previous years as a result of additional funding of $965,000 received to cover costs for the investigation of the Lac-Mégantic rail incident that occurred in July 2013.

Planned spending for fiscal years 2014–15 and onward consists of funding anticipated to be received through Main Estimates plus an estimated amount for compensation adjustments for terminable allowances. Although reductions of $1,283,000 from Budget 2012 have been applied, the budget was also increased by funding for compensation adjustments of approximately $940,000. The spending pattern over the planning years is anticipated to remain consistent as in years prior to 2013-14. However, a significant transportation accident, a flurry of smaller size occurrences, or further budget reductions could significantly change planned spending.

Alignment to Government of Canada outcomes

2014-15 Planned spending by Whole-of-Government-Framework Spending Area (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2014-15 Planned Spending
Risks to the safety of the transportation system are reduced 1.1 Air Investigation Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 13,340,998
  1.2 Marine Investigation     4,999,311
  1.3 Rail Investigation     4,955,098
  1.4 Pipeline Investigation     590,019
Total planned spending by spending area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Social Affairs 23,885,426

Departmental spending trend

Departmental spending trend graph

(1): Costs of services received without charge are not included in the total spending.

The spending amounts presented in the chart for fiscal years 2011–12 to 2012–13 are actual results as presented in the Public Accounts of Canada. Spending has remained consistent over the past two fiscal years.

Forecasted spending for fiscal year 2013-14 is $32.4 million. This estimate is based on total authorities less an estimated lapse of $0.35 million. Total authorities include reductions announced in Canada’s Economic Action Plan 2012 (Budget 2012), which called upon the TSB to reduce its operating expenditures by $1.3 million by 2014–15. These permanent reductions are reflected in TSB’s forecasted and planned spending amounts for 2013–14 and onward. The 2013-14 amount also includes additional funding received from Parliament through Supplementary Estimates for funding pressures for 2013-14 as a result of the investigation of a significant transportation occurrence (Lac-Mégantic, Quebec).

Fiscal year 2014-15 projected spending includes funding to be received through Main Estimates plus an estimated carry-forward of lapsed funds from 2013–14 of $0.35 million, as well as increases in funding for collective bargaining agreements anticipated to be received in Supplementary Estimates.

Projected spending for fiscal years 2015–16 and 2016–17 consists of funding anticipated to be received through Main Estimates plus an estimated amount for compensation adjustments for terminable allowances.

Amounts for 2014-15 and onward do not include anticipated funding through transfers from Treasury Board Secretariat Vote 30 related to the payout of severance pay and other salary-related items refundable by Treasury Board Secretariat, given that these amounts cannot be estimated with some certainty.

Estimates by vote

For information on TSB appropriations, please see the 2014–15 Main Estimates publication. Endnote vii

Section II: Analysis of programs by strategic outcome

Strategic outcome: The risks to the safety of the transportation system are reduced.

Programs

As shown in the 2014–15 Main Estimates, the TSB has the following four key programs:

  • Air Investigations
  • Marine Investigations
  • Rail Investigations
  • Pipeline Investigations

Program 1.1 Air Investigations

Description

Under the Air Investigations program, the TSB conducts independent investigations into selected air transportation occurrences in or over Canada and in certain circumstances internationally, to identify causes and contributing factors. This program includes the publication of investigation reports, the formulation of recommendations to improve safety, the communication of safety information, the conduct of outreach activities to advocate for changes, and the follow-up on responses to recommendations and other safety communications. The Air Investigations program also includes the fulfillment of Canada’s obligations related to transportation safety as required by the International Civil Aviation Organization. This program is governed by the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act, the Transportation Safety Board Regulations, and Annex 13 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2014-15 Main Estimates 2014-15 Planned Spending 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending
12,778,652 13,340,998 13,186,999 13,186,999
Human resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2017–18
102 102 102
Performance measurement
Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Air investigations are efficient Average time for completing investigation reports 450 days March 31, 2015
  Percentage of investigations completed within the published target time 75% March 31, 2015
Safety deficiencies in the aviation industry are addressed Percentage of responses to recommendations assessed as fully satisfactory (since TSB’s creation) 65% March 31, 2015
  Percentage of safety advisories on which safety actions have been taken 60% March 31, 2015

Planning highlights

In 2014-15, the TSB will continue to face significant challenges in achieving performance targets for the Air Investigations program. However, the established performance targets will remain unchanged. There are numerous outstanding safety issues that must be resolved in order to improve aviation safety for Canadians. It is therefore important for the TSB to maintain its targets and to work harder to achieve the desired results.

The TSB continues to face challenges in achieving its performance targets for the timely completion of investigation reports. Over the past year a detailed review of the investigation process was completed and a work plan was developed to improve the efficiency and timeliness of the process. A number of changes will be introduced during 2014-15 which should lead to an improvement in the performance results in future years. Investments in employee training will continue to be made. A number of measures have also recently been implemented to improve the tracking and management of the investigation workload, including the development of a new modal database for Air Investigations which should be in production by the end of 2014-15. Only modest progress is therefore expected in 2014-15 while the various changes are implemented.

Little progress is being made on the achievement of the Percentage of responses to recommendations assessed as fully satisfactory. Progress is very slow due to the systemic nature and complexity of some of the issues to be addressed, the complexity of the regulatory process, the need to harmonize standards with other countries, as well as the lack of buy-in from the regulators and industry stakeholders. The TSB will renew and sustain its outreach efforts in 2014-15 to try and convince regulators and industry to take appropriate safety actions to mitigate these outstanding safety risks.

Almost 50% of the Air Investigations workforce will be eligible for retirement within the next five years. For the next few years, a particular focus will therefore be placed on succession planning, proactive staffing, investments in training, and knowledge transfer to ensure that the TSB maintains an adequate capacity to deliver on its mandate with respect to aviation safety.

Program 1.2 Marine Investigations

Description

Under the Marine Investigations program, the TSB conducts independent investigations into selected marine transportation occurrences in Canada, and in certain circumstances internationally to identify causes and contributing factors. This program includes the publication of investigation reports, the formulation of recommendations to improve safety, the communication of safety information, outreach activities to advocate for change, and the follow-up on responses to recommendations and other safety communications. The Marine Investigations program also includes the fulfillment of some of Canada’s obligations related to transportation safety as required by the International Maritime Organization. This program is governed by the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act, the a Transportation Safety Board Regulations, and the Casualty Investigation Code of the International Maritime Organization.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2014-15 Main Estimates 2014-15 Planned Spending 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending
4,646,782 4,999,311 4,943,311 4,943,311
Human resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
36 36 36
Performance measurement
Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Marine investigations are efficient Average time for completing investigation reports 450 days March 31, 2015
  Percentage of investigations completed within the published target time 75% March 31, 2015
Safety deficiencies in the marine industry are addressed Percentage of responses to recommendations assessed as fully satisfactory (since TSB’s creation) 85% March 31, 2015
  Percentage of safety advisories on which safety actions have been taken 70% March 31, 2015

Planning highlights

In 2013-14, the Marine Branch was reorganized and staffing of all vacant positions was completed. The Branch is now composed of a well trained and highly skilled workforce. A new modal database for the Marine Investigations program was successfully implemented and a more rigorous project management approach was introduced. These efforts, made over the past two years, ensure that the TSB is now well positioned to achieve the expected results and meet the agreed upon targets.

The targets for two performance indicators have been reviewed and increased. The target for the Percentage of responses to recommendations assessed as fully satisfactory has been increased from 80% to 85% as it is anticipated that Transport Canada’s new Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations will address a number of outstanding recommendations. The target for the Percentage of safety advisories on which safety actions have been taken has also been increased in light of the positive results obtained in 2013-14.

Program 1.3 Rail Investigations

Description

Under the Rail Investigations program, the TSB conducts independent investigations into selected rail transportation occurrences to identify causes and contributing factors. This program includes the publication of investigation reports, the formulation of recommendations to improve safety, the communication of safety information, undertaking outreach activities to advocate for change, and the follow-up on responses to recommendations and other safety communications. The Rail Investigations program also includes the provision of assistance, upon request, to the provinces for the investigation of short-line railway occurrences under provincial jurisdiction. This program is governed by the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act and the Transportation Safety Board Regulations.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2014-15 Main Estimates 2014-15 Planned Spending 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending
4,646,783 4,955,098 4,899,098 4,899,098
Human resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
36 36 36
Performance measurement
Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Rail investigations are efficient Average time for completing investigation reports 450 days March 31, 2015
  Percentage of investigations completed within the published target time 75% March 31, 2015
Safety deficiencies in the rail industry are addressed Percentage of responses to recommendations assessed as fully satisfactory (since TSB’s creation) 89% March 31, 2015
  Percentage of safety advisories on which safety actions have been taken 75% March 31, 2015

Planning highlights

Progress continues to be made towards achieving performance targets set for the Rail Investigations program. The TSB however faces an important challenge due to the heavy workload associated with completion of the Lac-Mégantic investigation and a larger than usual number of active investigations. The Rail Branch will continue to manage its investigation process rigorously. Through effective coordination within the investigation teams, early development of the sequence of events and early identification of safety deficiencies, we expect to complete concise focused reports in a timely manner.

The target for the Percentage of safety advisories on which safety actions have been taken has been increased in light of the positive results obtained in 2013-14.

Despite the very positive responses and high level of safety actions taken, significant Rail safety issues remain unresolved. Continued and sustained efforts are therefore required by the TSB to make compelling arguments that will influence the Regulator and industry to take appropriate safety actions. In 2014-15, particular efforts will be made to work with industry to address their concerns with respect to the use of on-board recorders for legitimate safety purposes.

Six new Rail recommendations were issued by the TSB during 2013-14. These new recommendations may impact the ability to achieve the target set for the Percentage of responses to recommendations assessed as Fully Satisfactory as the Regulator needs time to develop an action plan and to work with industry to implement the required safety actions.

Another challenge for 2014-15 is the recruitment and training of new investigators to replace retiring experts. As a number of Rail personnel will be eligible to retire within 24 months, effective succession planning and proactive staffing will remain a priority for the coming year. Priority will also continue to be placed on the training of new staff and the transfer of knowledge.

Program 1.4 Pipeline Investigations

Description

Under the Pipeline Investigations program, the TSB conducts independent investigations into selected pipeline occurrences under federal jurisdiction within Canada to identify causes and contributing factors. This program also includes the publication of investigation reports, the formulation of recommendations to improve safety, the communication of safety information, undertaking outreach activities to advocate for change, and the follow-up on responses to recommendations and other safety communications. This program is governed by the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act and the Transportation Safety Board Regulations.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2014-15 Main Estimates 2014-15 Planned Spending 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending
580,848 590,019 583,019 583,019
Human resources (FTEs*)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
3 3 3
Performance measurement
Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved
Pipeline investigations are efficient Average time for completing investigation reports 450 days March 31, 2015
  Percentage of investigations completed within the published target time 100% March 31, 2015
Safety deficiencies in the pipeline industry are addressed Percentage of responses to recommendations assessed as fully satisfactory (since TSB’s creation) 100% March 31, 2015
  Percentage of safety advisories on which safety actions have been taken 75% March 31, 2015

Planning highlights

The TSB will continue its efforts to ensure the timely completion of its Pipeline investigations and of its safety communications. Particular challenges for 2014-15, include the recruitment of new investigators to replace retiring personnel and ensuring an adequate response capacity is in place to deal with a major occurrence.

At this time, there are no outstanding Pipeline recommendations, as all have been assessed as fully satisfactory. However, efforts are being made to analyze the increasing trend in the number of reported small incidents within the pipeline industry. The results of this analysis will be used as a basis to support outreach activities aimed at increasing the level of awareness and ultimately reducing the number of small incidents.

Internal services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2014-15 Main Estimates 2014-15 Planned Spending 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending
6,389,326 6,493,502 6,416,501 6,416,501
Human resources (FTEs)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
48 48 48

Planning highlights

In 2014-15, the Internal Services program will continue to implement ways to more effectively deliver programs and services in support of the four investigation programs. A particular focus will be placed on implementing common business processes and moving towards the adoption of standard government-wide solutions where operationally feasible. While there are many benefits to centralized and/or shared services, the TSB is concerned that the cost of these services may exceed the department’s current costs for internal services, which have been reduced as a result of streamlining measures to achieve the savings required by Budget 2012.

Another Internal Services priority for 2014–15 is to continue to improve the tools and guidance with respect to information management. During the year, the TSB will finalize its work on the modernization of the transportations occurrence databases, with the modernization of the Air Investigations database. Additionally, the TSB has implemented a digital-only approach for records relating to investigations and will continue to review its investigation management system to ensure that requirements for electronic records management are fully met.

Other Internal Services priorities for 2014-15 include:

  • Supporting the recruitment and development of investigators as the TSB faces a period of high turnover due to employee retirements;
  • Continuing to build on the TSB’s performance management framework to ensure strong linkages exist between organizational performance and individual employee performance objectives/evaluations; and
  • Developing a risk-based internal audit plan to identify recommended audits and evaluations over the next three fiscal years;
  • Reviewing options for meeting time requirements under the Access to Information Act in the face of significant increases in the volume of requests.

Section III: Supplementary information

Future-oriented statement of operations

The future-oriented condensed statement of operations presented in this subsection is intended to serve as a general overview of the Transportation Safety Board’s operations. The forecasted financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management. Because the future-oriented statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of this report are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts will differ.

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the TSB’s website.

Future-oriented condensed statement of operations for the year ended March 31 (dollars)
Financial information Estimated Results 2013-14 Planned Results 2014-15 Change
Total Expenses 34,218,000 34,510,000 +0.8%
Total Revenues 60,000 46,000 -23.3%
Net Cost of Operations 34,158,000 34,464,000 +0.9%

As shown in the table above, the TSB is projecting a net cost of operations of $34.5 million for 2014-15. This projection is based upon funding requested in the 2014–15 Main Estimates, plus estimated unused funding carried forward from 2013–14 and compensation adjustments for terminable allowances. On an accrual accounting basis, the TSB is forecasting less than a 1% variation in the net cost of operations expenses between years. In 2013-14, the increase in expenses due to the Lac-Mégantic investigation has been offset by a significant reduction in the liability for employee severance benefits, following amendments to collective agreements signed in the year.

Supplementary information table

The electronic version of the table containing information about our approach to the greening of government operations can be found on the TSB website Endnote viii.

Section IV: Organizational contact information

Additional information about the Transportation Safety Board of Canada and its activities is available on the TSB website Endnote ix or by contacting us at:

Transportation Safety Board of Canada
Place du Centre
200 Promenade du Portage, 4th Floor
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 1K8

E-mail: communications@bst-tsb.gc.ca
Social media: socialmedia@bst-tsb.gc.ca
Toll Free: 1-800-387-3557
Fax: 819-997-2239

Endnotes

Endnote 1

Treasury Board Secretariat Estimates Publications and Appropriation Acts, http://publiservice.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ems-sgd/esp-pbc/esp-pbc-eng.asp

Return to endnote i referrer

Endnote 2

elected Departmental Performance Reports for 2008-2009 – Department of Industry, Department of Transport. Report of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, September 2010, http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Mode=1&Parl=40&Ses=3&Language=E&DocId=4653561&File=0

Return to endnote ii referrer

Endnote 3

Strengthening Parliamentary Scrutiny of Estimates and Supply. Report of the Standing Committee on Government and Operations Estimates, June 2012, http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?DocId=5690996&Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=41&Ses=1

Return to endnote iii referrer

Endnote 4

Whole-of-government framework, http://publiservice.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ppg-cpr/frame-cadre-eng.aspx

Return to endnote iv referrer

Endnote 5

Transportation Safety Board of Canada, http://www.bst-tsb.gc.ca/eng/

Return to endnote v referrer

Endnote 6

Transportation Safety Board of Canada, http://www.tsb.gc.ca/eng/publications/index.asp#a7

Return to endnote vi referrer

Endnote 7

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/index-eng.asp

Return to endnote vii referrer

Endnote 8

Transportation Safety Board of Canada, http://www.bst-tsb.gc.ca/eng/publications/index.asp#rpp

Return to endnote viii referrer

Endnote 9

Transportation Safety Board of Canada, http://www.bst-tsb.gc.ca/eng/

Return to endnote ix referrer